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NGSS in Action

In an NGSS classroom, students do what scientists do in real life!

The NGSS calls for deep linkages between the three dimensions of crosscutting concepts, disciplinary core ideas, and science and engineering practices. To do this effectively, students need to gather evidence from a variety of sources, make sense of that evidence, and construct strong scientific arguments about real-world phenomena.

  1. Gathering evidence…In an NGSS classroom students collect evidence from a variety of sources.
  • Hands-on investigations
  • Physical models
  • Interactive digital simulations
  • Scientific texts
  • Media, including video clips, photographs, maps, and data sets
  1. Make sense of evidence…Students make sense of evidence by:
  • Highlighting and annotating texts
  • Iteratively revising models
  • Weighing the strength of scientific arguments
  • Analyzing trends in data sets
  • Manipulating variables and recording observations from digital simulations
  • Discussing ideas and questions with classmates
  1. Construct convincing scientific arguments…Students use evidence to formulate convincing scientific arguments:
  • Write a scientific argument supporting a claim using evidence they’ve collected
  • Construct and revise models and write sophisticated scientific explanations
  • Engage in oral argumentation in Science Seminars (grades 6-8)
  • Evaluate the strengths of competing claims

What Do Lessons Look Like? 

https://vimeo.com/185003343

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jMjTJm2d-s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iN8xbyFZk0w

https://www.nextgenscience.org/resources/examples-quality-ngss-design

https://www.state.nj.us/education/modelcurriculum/sci/index.shtml

By |2018-12-18T17:04:16+00:00December 18th, 2018|NGSS|0 Comments

The 5E Model & NGSS

For Curriculum & Instruction / Supervisors, and Principals

WHERE TO START?

The 5E Model, developed in 1987 by the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, promotes collaborative, active learning in which students work together to solve problems and investigate new concepts by asking questions, observing, analyzing, and drawing conclusions.

The 5E Model is based on the constructivist theory to learning, which suggests that people construct knowledge and meaning from experiences. By understanding and reflecting on activities, students are able to reconcile new knowledge with previous ideas.

In the classroom, constructivism requires educators to build inquiry, exploration, and assessment into their instructional approach. In many ways, this means the teacher plays the role of a facilitator, guiding students as they learn new concepts.

The Model Explained

Engage:  ask a question about objects and events in the environment.

When students Engage, they:

  • Express prior knowledge
  • Ask questions
  • Make observations

Explore:  conduct a simple investigation.

When students Explore, they:

  • Think freely
  • Test predictions and hypotheses
  • Record observations and ideas

Explain:  use data to construct a reasonable explanation.

When students Explain, they:

  • Explain possible solutions
  • Listen to others critically
  • Refer to previous activities or experiences

Elaborate:  extend the concept.

When students Elaborate, they:

  • Apply new labels, definitions, etc.
  • Record observations and explanations
  • Draw reasonable conclusions using evidence

Evaluate:   demonstrate understanding of concepts and ability to use inquiry skills.

When students Evaluate, they:

  • Answer open-ended questions
  • Demonstrate understanding of knowledge
  • Evaluate own progress

The 5E Model allows educators to create a unique learning experience for students. Teachers who can incorporate instructional models like the 5E Model into their classrooms help students build a strong foundation of knowledge through active participation. 

By |2018-11-27T15:02:33+00:00November 27th, 2018|NGSS|0 Comments